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Grade 6- Resources by Grade Level

Posted on May 31, 2020 in Grade 6, Resources, Resources By Concept, Wonder & Question Investigate & Interpret

Grade – 6

Health Outcome – USC 6.4

What is Stress?
Developed by Trista Kennett and Talia Fawcett

Write the essential question ‘What is stress?’ on the board for all students to see. Students will create a list of all the stressors they can think of. They will compare and contrast the main stressors of people their age, people who just graduated, and people who have children. Students will also explore the difference between good and bad stress as well as positive and harmful reactions to stress. Discuss the idea of things you can control and things you can’t (internal and external factors). What are the ways in which we can be proactive in preventing stress? What actions should we take in response to feeling stressed? When should it be concluded that professional help is needed to help us manage out stress? How can our families and those close to us help us manage our stress? How can our communities work to provide a healthier environment to manage stress? The teacher can facilitate a conversation around these topics.

Assessment Criteria:

  • I can identify several things that cause me stress
  • I can identify several different things that may cause other people stress
  • I can identify several signs that a person needs to seek professional help in relation to stress

I can identify ways in which my family, friends, and community can support each other

Grade – 6

Health Outcome – USC 6.4

Coping Mechanisms
Developed by Trista Kennett and Talia Fawcett

Students will be given several ‘emails’ from different people who are feeling stressed due to a variety of different factors. Students will first need to identify what is causing the person to feel stressed. Students will then do personal research on different coping mechanisms that people can use. They will then weigh the pros and cons to each coping mechanism and choose one mechanism they would suggest for each person that would best fit their situation. One of the emails will contain a description of someone who is displaying extreme anxiety in which seeking professional help is needed. Students will then be placed into groups and asked the following questions: what is the main stressor for each person? How might they respond to this stress? What are some positive coping mechanisms they can use? The teacher can then bring the whole class together for a group conversation in which the teacher will ask if any of the people should seek professional help. The teacher can end with a conversation about how we cannot always control our stressors in life, but we can always try to control our coping mechanisms and how we respond.

Assessment Criteria:

Outcome – USC 6.4

  • I can identify ways in which people may respond to stress physical, mentally, and emotionally
  • I can identify stressors that people can and can’t control
  • I can determine when situations may require professional attention

Resources:
Coping Mechanisms

Grade – 6

Health Outcome – USC 6.4

Treaty Outcome SI62

The Importance of Oral Language
Developed by Trista Kennett and Talia Fawcett


As a class, the teacher and students will create an anchor chart that has healthy and unhealthy coping mechanisms on it in relation to dealing with stress. Students will identify situations in which a healthy coping mechanism may turn unhealthy (ex. Spending time alone when needed, but not becoming isolated). Students will then be asked to raise their hand if they have ever felt stressed. The students will then write down three descriptive words about how they feel when they feel stressed. The teacher will then introduce a Youtube[i] video of residential school survivors taking about their experience, and their healing process. The students will write down different instances where the residential school survivors could not use their language during stressful situations. After the video, the class will share some of their answers. The teacher should highlight the importance of oral language in Indigenous cultures, and should also emphasize that in any culture, oral language is a very important coping mechanism. Students should then be given time to reflect in their journals to the following questions: What is one thing that shocked you from the video? How has using oral language helped the residential school survivors heal from the trauma that they faced? How will the importance of oral language affect how you cope with stress in the future? As an activity, students can be split into groups and given a tube of toothpaste as well as a plate. Students will decorate their plate and use all of the toothpaste out of the tube. They will then have to try and get the toothpaste back into the tube. The teacher should then explain that though oral language is very useful as a healthy response to coping with stress and anxiety, language is also very powerful. We need to be careful with how we speak about others and respond in stressful situations because we cannot take our words back once they have been said.

Assessment Criteria:

  • I can understand that different ways of managing stress can result in short-term and long-term consequences that can affect me physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually.
  • I can understand the importance of oral communication as a way to respond to stress.
  • I can understand the long-term consequences of residential schools connecting to language loss and responses to great stress.

[i] Indigenous Peoples in the Canadian Residential Schools: RISE (Clip). (2017, February 17). Retrieved November 30, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QMZaOVOin8.

Viewing Guide

Grade – 6

Health Outcome – USC 6.4, DM6.8, DM6.9

Arts Outcome – CP6.10

How Do You Cope?
Developed by Trista Kennett and Talia Fawcett


Students will interview someone close to them about the person’s go-to coping mechanism that they use when they feel stressed. Students will then share their ‘data’ from their interview with a partner and they will highlight the coping mechanism that their interviewee used. They will make a pros and cons list on poster board in relation to the identified coping mechanism. The students will then have to decide together if they think the coping mechanism is healthy or not. After they are finished their poster, they will mount it on the wall. The students will then go on a gallery walk, where students can read other people’s coping mechanisms shared. The students will choose which ones they think would be the most beneficial for them, and they leave a sticky note beside their chosen one. They will then write down three mechanisms from the gallery walk that they think are the most beneficial. Students will make a SMART goal under the guidance of the teacher. Their goal will derive from the question, “How can I improve my classroom environment by providing easy access to a healthy coping mechanism?” After the students fill out a SMART goal, they will hand it in to the teacher who will then check it over and review the goals. The teacher will then hand back the SMART goals with their feedback on it. The teacher will explain that they are going to make a ‘Calm Corner’ in their classroom in which the students will be displaying their chosen coping mechanism. Students will be given class time to make their project. Student projects can come in the form of posters (ex. How to breathe deeply to calm yourself), a physical object (ex. A home-made stress ball), a cd (ex. A sound track of ocean sounds), etc. throughout this process, the teacher should be monitoring students and providing assistance when needed. After the projects are finished, the students will put their projects in the class room at the designated area. As a class, we will then create invitations to give to other students and classrooms in the school to invite them to use our Calm Corner during recess whenever they feel stressed.

Assessment Criteria:

  • I can learn from my family and community about common ways they use to cope with stress
  • I can apply healthy decision-making that influences my personal standards for responding to stress
  • I can design and implement a plan of research and create a visual representation of a healthy coping mechanism for stress
  • I can improve my classroom environment by providing options for stress management

Resources:
Coping Mechanisms